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Name Raid

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Image of Raid of the Texas Gambling Ship - 1930s

Raid of the Texas Gambling Ship - 1930s

Investigators unload gambling machines from the gambling ship Texas during a police raid. The Texas was located off the shore of Venice.

Image of Raid on the Texas Gambling Ship - 1930s

Raid on the Texas Gambling Ship - 1930s

Investigators unload gambling machines from the gambling ship Texas during a police raid. The Texas was located off the shore of Venice.

Image of Rex Gambling Ship, 1939 - 1939/11/21

Rex Gambling Ship, 1939 - 1939/11/21

A view of the Rex Gambling Ship during a police raid. The Rex was anchored three miles off the Santa Monica Pier and water taxis from the Pier transported gamblers to its tables. Operations began on May 1, 1938 and ended in late 1939. Tony Cornero, owner of the Rex, hoped to get around the law prohibiting gambling by stationing his ship three miles offshore. However, a court ruled that California's western boundary included those waters. Going further offshore into rougher waters caused Cornero's business to suffer so he returned the ship to shallower waters. State Attorney General Earl Warren authorized a series of raids on the Rex to shut down Conero's gambling operations. The police raid

Image of Raid on the Texas Gambling Ship - 1930s

Raid on the Texas Gambling Ship - 1930s

An investigator takes apart a roulette wheel during a police raid on the gambling ship Texas. The Texas was located off the shore of Venice.

Image of Raid on the Rex Gambling Ship, 1939 - 1939/11/21

Raid on the Rex Gambling Ship, 1939 - 1939/11/21

Walter Hunt and Oscar Jahnsen are wet from tossing slot machines into the sea. In this photo, they pose destroying a roulette wheel with an ax during a raid on the gambling ship Rex. The Rex was anchored three miles off the Santa Monica Pier and water taxis from the Pier transported gamblers to its tables. Operations began on May 1, 1938 and ended in late 1939. Tony Cornero, owner of the Rex, hoped to get around the law prohibiting gambling by stationing his ship three miles offshore. However, a court ruled that California's western boundary included those waters. Going further offshore into rougher waters caused Cornero's business to suffer so he returned the ship to shallower waters. State

Image of Raid on the Gambling Ship Rex, 1939 - 1939/11/21

Raid on the Gambling Ship Rex, 1939 - 1939/11/21

Investigators, including Oscar Jahnsen and George Contreras, examine equipment on the gambling ship Rex during a police raid. The Rex was anchored three miles off the Santa Monica Pier and water taxis from the Pier transported gamblers to its tables. Operations began on May 1, 1938 and ended in late 1939. Tony Cornero, owner of the Rex, hoped to get around the law prohibiting gambling by stationing his ship three miles offshore. However, a court ruled that California's western boundary included those waters. Going further offshore into rougher waters caused Cornero's business to suffer so he returned the ship to shallower waters. State Attorney General Earl Warren authorized a series of raid

Image of Raid on the Gambling Ship Texas - 1930s

Raid on the Gambling Ship Texas - 1930s

Investigators take apart gambling tables during the police raid on the Texas. The Texas was a gambling ship located off the shore in Venice.

Image of Raid on the Rex Gambling Ship, 1939 - 1939/11/21

Raid on the Rex Gambling Ship, 1939 - 1939/11/21

Police, including Oscar Jahnsen, raid the gambling ship the Rex. The Rex was anchored three miles off the Santa Monica Pier and water taxis from the Pier transported gamblers to its tables. Operations began on May 1, 1938 and ended in late 1939. Tony Cornero, owner of the Rex, hoped to get around the law prohibiting gambling by stationing his ship three miles offshore. However, a court ruled that California's western boundary included those waters. Going further offshore into rougher waters caused Cornero's business to suffer so he returned the ship to shallower waters. State Attorney General Earl Warren authorized a series of raids on the Rex to shut down Conero's gambling operations. The p

Image of Raid on the Rex Gambling Ship, 1939 - 1939/11/21

Raid on the Rex Gambling Ship, 1939 - 1939/11/21

Slot machines confiscated during the November, 1939, raid of the Rex gambling ship in Santa Monica Bay are dumped into the ocean. The Rex was anchored three miles off the Santa Monica Pier and water taxis from the Pier transported gamblers to its tables. Operations began on May 1, 1938 and ended in late 1939. Tony Cornero, owner of the Rex, hoped to get around the law prohibiting gambling by stationing his ship three miles offshore. However, a court ruled that California's western boundary included those waters. Going further offshore into rougher waters caused Cornero's business to suffer so he returned the ship to shallower waters. Authorities raided the Rex in 1939. State Attorney General

Image of Raid on the Rex Gambling Ship, 1939 - 1939/11/21

Raid on the Rex Gambling Ship, 1939 - 1939/11/21

Slot machines confiscated during the November, 1939, raid of the Rex gambling ship in Santa Monica Bay are loaded onto a vessel named the Ocean Park Orca. The Rex was anchored three miles off the Santa Monica Pier and water taxis from the Pier transported gamblers to its tables. Operations began on May 1, 1938 and ended in late 1939. Tony Cornero, owner of the Rex, hoped to get around the law prohibiting gambling by stationing his ship three miles offshore. However, a court ruled that California's western boundary included those waters. Going further offshore into rougher waters caused Cornero's business to suffer so he returned the ship to shallower waters. State Attorney General Earl Warre

Image of Dumping Illicit Slot Machines, 1948 - 1948/08/12

Dumping Illicit Slot Machines, 1948 - 1948/08/12

A group of men throw slot machines into the ocean. This photo ran in the Evening Outlook on Augst 13th. The caption reads: "Slot Machines | Into the briny deep went five slot machines seized in a police raid on the Culinary Workers Union Hall, 137 Pier Avenue, Ocean Park. Photo shows police officers hurling the 'one-arm bandits' into the Pacific Ocean from the Santa Monica lifeguard boat. The machines were permanently submerged yesterday on orders from Police Chief Joe McClelland." Accompanying notes on Pacific Press Photos letterhead state: "It is the first time in ten years that illegal slot machines have been disposed of in this manner. (They usually are broken up with sledge hammers.)

Image of Dumping Illicit Slot Machines, 1948 - 1948/08/12

Dumping Illicit Slot Machines, 1948 - 1948/08/12

A group of men throw slot machines into the ocean. This photo ran in the Evening Outlook on Augst 13th. The caption reads: "Slot Machines | Into the briny deep went five slot machines seized in a police raid on the Culinary Workers Union Hall, 137 Pier Avenue, Ocean Park. Photo shows police officers hurling the 'one-arm bandits' into the Pacific Ocean from the Santa Monica lifeguard boat. The machines were permanently submerged yesterday on orders from Police Chief Joe McClelland." Accompanying notes on Pacific Press Photos letterhead state: "It is the first time in ten years that illegal slot machines have been disposed of in this manner. (They usually are broken up with sledge hammers.)

Image of Dumping Illicit Slot Machines, 1948 - 1948/08/12

Dumping Illicit Slot Machines, 1948 - 1948/08/12

A group of men throw slot machines into the ocean. This photo ran in the Evening Outlook on Augst 13th. The caption reads: "Slot Machines | Into the briny deep went five slot machines seized in a police raid on the Culinary Workers Union Hall, 137 Pier Avenue, Ocean Park. Photo shows police officers hurling the 'one-arm bandits' into the Pacific Ocean from the Santa Monica lifeguard boat. The machines were permanently submerged yesterday on orders from Police Chief Joe McClelland." Accompanying notes on Pacific Press Photos letterhead state: "It is the first time in ten years that illegal slot machines have been disposed of in this manner. (They usually are broken up with sledge hammers.)

Image of Dumping Illicit Slot Machines, 1948 - 1948/08/12

Dumping Illicit Slot Machines, 1948 - 1948/08/12

A group of men throw slot machines into the ocean. This photo ran in the Evening Outlook on Augst 13th. The caption reads: "Slot Machines | Into the briny deep went five slot machines seized in a police raid on the Culinary Workers Union Hall, 137 Pier Avenue, Ocean Park. Photo shows police officers hurling the 'one-arm bandits' into the Pacific Ocean from the Santa Monica lifeguard boat. The machines were permanently submerged yesterday on orders from Police Chief Joe McClelland." Accompanying notes on Pacific Press Photos letterhead state: "It is the first time in ten years that illegal slot machines have been disposed of in this manner. (They usually are broken up with sledge hammers.)

Image of Dumping Illicit Slot Machines, 1948 - 1948/08/12

Dumping Illicit Slot Machines, 1948 - 1948/08/12

A group of men throw slot machines into the ocean. This photo ran in the Evening Outlook on Augst 13th. The caption reads: "Slot Machines | Into the briny deep went five slot machines seized in a police raid on the Culinary Workers Union Hall, 137 Pier Avenue, Ocean Park. Photo shows police officers hurling the 'one-arm bandits' into the Pacific Ocean from the Santa Monica lifeguard boat. The machines were permanently submerged yesterday on orders from Police Chief Joe McClelland." Accompanying notes on Pacific Press Photos letterhead state: "It is the first time in ten years that illegal slot machines have been disposed of in this manner. (They usually are broken up with sledge hammers.)

Image of The Rex Gambling Ship - 1930s

The Rex Gambling Ship - 1930s

Three miles off the coast of Santa Monica Beach, the Rex welcomed the water taxis from the Santa Monica Pier transporting gamblers to its tables. Operations began on May 1, 1938 and ended circa 1940. State Attorney General Earl Warren authorized a series of raids on the Rex to shut down Tony Conero's gambling operations. (Credit: Santa Monica History Museum/Bill Beebe Collection)

Image of Investigator Aboard the Rex, 1939 - 1939

Investigator Aboard the Rex, 1939 - 1939

Police investigator Oscar Jahnsen waving to the camera. During the 1930s, gambling was an illicit enterprise so bootlegger and gambling entreprenuer Tony Cornero provided gambling three miles offshore from the Santa Monica Pier. State Attorney General Earl Warren authorized a series of raids on the Rex to shut down Conero's gambling operations. (Credit: Santa Monica History Museum/Bill Beebe Collection)

Image of Police Raid Rex Gambling Ship - 1930s

Police Raid Rex Gambling Ship - 1930s

Gambling was an illicit enterprise during the 1930s in Southern California. This gambling equipment is for the gambling ship, the Rex, which was stationed three miles off the Santa Monica Pier, outside California's legal jurisdiction, or so the Rex's owner, Tony Cornero, thought. State Attorney General Earl Warren authorized a series of raids on the Rex to shut down Conero's gambling operations. (Credit: Santa Monica History Museum/Bill Beebe Collection)

Image of Police Raid on the Rex Gambling Ship, 1939 - 1939

Police Raid on the Rex Gambling Ship, 1939 - 1939

Men examine a slot machine on the gambling ship Rex. Because gambling was illegal during the 1930s in Southern California, the Rex was stationed three miles offshore from the Santa Monica Pier, outside California's legal jurisdiction. State Attorney General Earl Warren authorized a series of raids on the Rex to shut down Tony Cornero's gambling operations. L to R: unknown, Deputy District Attorney John Klein, Sheriff Captain George Contreras, unknown. [man on right appears to be SM Police Captain Clarence Webb] (Credit: Santa Monica History Museum/Bill Beebe Collection)

Image of Police Raid on the Rex Gambling Ship - 1930s

Police Raid on the Rex Gambling Ship - 1930s

Tony Cornero, owner of the gambling ship, the Rex, was hoping to avoid the illegality of gambling by having his ship stationed three miles offshore from the Santa Monica Pier. However, a court ruled that California's western boundary included those waters. Going further offshore into rougher waters caused his business to decrease so he went back to shallower waters. State Attorney General Earl Warren authorized a series of raids on the Rex to shut down Conero's gambling operations. In this raid, at least seventy slot machines were thrown overboard. (Credit: Santa Monica History Museum/Bill Beebe Collection)